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Regular expression for validating numbers

It was chaired by Jon Bosak of Sun Microsystems with the active participation of an XML Special Interest Group (previously known as the SGML Working Group) also organized by the W3C.The membership of the XML Working Group is given in an appendix.The errata list for this fifth edition is available at A Test Suite is maintained to help assessing conformance to this specification.This document has been reviewed by W3C Members, by software developers, and by other W3C groups and interested parties, and is endorsed by the Director as a W3C Recommendation.XML has been designed for ease of implementation and for interoperability with both SGML and HTML.This section describes the status of this document at the time of its publication. A list of current W3C publications and the latest revision of this technical report can be found in the W3C technical reports index at characters with both precomposed and base diacritic forms) match only if they have the same representation in both strings. (Of strings and rules in the grammar:) A string matches a grammatical production if it belongs to the language generated by that production.

XML was developed by an XML Working Group (originally known as the SGML Editorial Review Board) formed under the auspices of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) in 1996.An individual who has actual knowledge of a patent which the individual believes contains Essential Claim(s) must disclose the information in accordance with section 6 of the W3C Patent Policy.1 Introduction 1.1 Origin and Goals 1.2 Terminology 2 Documents 2.1 Well-Formed XML Documents 2.2 Characters 2.3 Common Syntactic Constructs 2.4 Character Data and Markup 2.5 Comments 2.6 Processing Instructions 2.7 CDATA Sections 2.8 Prolog and Document Type Declaration 2.9 Standalone Document Declaration 2.10 White Space Handling 2.11 End-of-Line Handling 2.12 Language Identification 3 Logical Structures 3.1 Start-Tags, End-Tags, and Empty-Element Tags 3.2 Element Type Declarations 3.2.1 Element Content 3.2.2 Mixed Content 3.3 Attribute-List Declarations 3.3.1 Attribute Types 3.3.2 Attribute Defaults 3.3.3 Attribute-Value Normalization 3.4 Conditional Sections 4 Physical Structures 4.1 Character and Entity References 4.2 Entity Declarations 4.2.1 Internal Entities 4.2.2 External Entities 4.3 Parsed Entities 4.3.1 The Text Declaration 4.3.2 Well-Formed Parsed Entities 4.3.3 Character Encoding in Entities 4.4 XML Processor Treatment of Entities and References 4.4.1 Not Recognized 4.4.2 Included 4.4.3 Included If Validating 4.4.4 Forbidden 4.4.5 Included in Literal 4.4.6 Notify 4.4.7 Bypassed 4.4.8 Included as PE 4.4.9 Error 4.5 Construction of Entity Replacement Text 4.6 Predefined Entities 4.7 Notation Declarations 4.8 Document Entity 5 Conformance 5.1 Validating and Non-Validating Processors 5.2 Using XML Processors 6 Notation A References A.1 Normative References A.2 Other References B Character Classes C XML and SGML (Non-Normative) D Expansion of Entity and Character References (Non-Normative) E Deterministic Content Models (Non-Normative) F Autodetection of Character Encodings (Non-Normative) F.1 Detection Without External Encoding Information F.2 Priorities in the Presence of External Encoding Information G W3C XML Working Group (Non-Normative) H W3C XML Core Working Group (Non-Normative) I Production Notes (Non-Normative) J Suggestions for XML Names (Non-Normative) Extensible Markup Language, abbreviated XML, describes a class of data objects called XML documents and partially describes the behavior of computer programs which process them.Copyright © 2008 The Extensible Markup Language (XML) is a subset of SGML that is completely described in this document.Its goal is to enable generic SGML to be served, received, and processed on the Web in the way that is now possible with HTML.This enhances the functionality and interoperability of the Web.W3C maintains a public list of any patent disclosures made in connection with the deliverables of the group; that page also includes instructions for disclosing a patent.This edition supersedes the previous W3C Recommendation of 16 August 2006.Please report errors in this document to the public [email protected] list; public archives are available.For the convenience of readers, an XHTML version with color-coded revision indicators is also provided; this version highlights each change due to an erratum published in the errata list for the previous edition, together with a link to the particular erratum in that list.Most of the errata in the list provide a rationale for the change.

674 comments

  1. Regular expressions. kind of a scary thing for most developers. Well it is scary because its not something that is really user friendly for.

  2. Using JavaScript to confirm username and password input format. Examples of form validation using both simple and complex regular expressions. Restricting to.

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